Guest rooms

Escape the everyday, and relax in our individual rooms.

Ichino-zashiki

All are reclaimed buildings, built approximately 200 years ago during the shogunate period, and are built in pure Japanese style, with each reasonable subdued room of about 16 square meters .
We recommend these rooms to solo travelers of any gender or age.

Nino-zashiki

Room sizes vary.
These buildings have withstood years of heavy snowfall in the Uonuma region and are constructed with thick pillars and beams.
They have no ostentation or ornamentation, yet one feels grandeur and stately warmth from the wooden environment.
Each of these rooms have been given a name by Zen master Arai Sekiryu of Untoan.

Shin-zashiki

These rooms have two spaces of about 16 square meters and 7 square meters.
This is a dismantled and reconstructed Shoya house of a wealthy farmer landowner from 180 years ago in the Tokamachi Takayanagi region.
Each of these rooms has been given a name by Zen master Hata Egyoku of the Eihei-ji Temple, a head temple of the Soto School of Buddhism.

Honkan-zashiki

Room sizes may vary.
This is a dismantled and reconstructed Shoya house of a landowner. It was built 230 years ago in the Muikamachi area.
Each of these rooms have been given a name by Zen master Arai Sekiryu of Untoan.
Rooms are tastefully appointed with a hearth.
During the winter, guests can light a charcoal fire in a heath, making the room indescribably relaxing.
Guests who wish to light a charcoal fire should kindly request one.
Feel the warmth of the charcoal fire against your skin while enjoying the wonderful atmosphere.
These are not “old fashioned,” which are popular today, but rather the actual good old ways of the Japanese culture that can be experienced firsthand.

Room with Japanese-style beds

This is a dismantled and reconstructed Shoya house of a landowner. It was built 230 years ago in the Muikamachi area.
This room has been given its name by Zen master Arai Sekryu of Untoan.
This is the only room with two Japanese-style beds.

Room with a mountain view

This special room is the only one built on the second-floor. It was made for Prince Takamatsu of the imperial family.
With a main and auxiliary area, this has tatami mat corridors and affords views of Sakadoyama, a national heritage site. It looks wonderful in each season.

Small garden side

Because a mansion was formerly located halfway up Sakadoyama, now a designated cultural heritage site by the Japanese government, it was named “onmayashiki,” and it faces the small garden on the Sakadoyama side.
Each room has been given a name by Arai Shoryu, the 46th Zen master at Untoan, which was the most renowned Zen temple in the Echigo area.

Large garden side

Because a mansion was formerly located halfway up Sakadoyama, now a designated cultural heritage site by the Japanese government, it was named “onmayashiki.”
And it faces the large 13,000 square meter garden.
Wild ducks and colored carp swim in the gardens pond, which is part of the historic Sakadoyama.
At night it is well-lit, exuding a fantastic atmosphere.
Each room has been given a name by Arai Shoryu, the 46th Zen master at Untoan, which was the most renowned Zen temple in the Echigo area.

Separate villa

This very quiet villa, “Haguro Hana,” is part of Sakadoyama, a national heritage site. It can be freely used as a second house.
It is the only room in Ryugon with a natural hot spring bath.

Villa with tea room

This room is hidden away in a corner of the large garden that is the pride of Ryugon. The front has a large 13,000 square meter garden with beautiful scenery during each season.
The rear area has a cedar forest in historic Sakadoyama and one can hear the burbling spring-fed brooks.
Guests can not only stay here, but also use the facilities for haiku gatherings and parties.